Turn peril into possibility

The Business Ethics Field Guide gives you the skills and tools to make better decisions when faced with dilemmas

Every day, good people make poor choices, because the right choice is not always obvious. Learn more about the book that helps you face ethical dilemmas with confidence.

Knowing the rules isn’t enough. While normal compliance training focuses on the do’s and don’ts, Leading with Ethics focuses on the HOW by giving people the skills to navigate any ethical moment of decision.

With flexible delivery options, and customized versions for Health Care, Law Enforcement, Military, Cyber Security, and more—it’s easier than ever to help people make good decisions.

Teaching ethics? Check out our new all-in-one digital resource with curriculum, videos, online activities and more

No Cost for instructors

Whether you’ve been teaching ethics and CSR for a long time, or you’re brand new, you can give students a great experience with much less work. The Business Ethics & Society Classroom In-A-Box gives you over 30 modules to choose from and automates the whole process for students and for instructors.

Join a Webinar

See why “learning the company rules” falls short of preparing your people to make the most of every situation and protect the trust and confidence of your customers, partners and employees.

Bill O’Rourke, co-author of the Business Ethics Field Guide, walks through the 13 types of dilemmas you might face and shares tips about how to prepare people to meet them.

Share Your Dilemma

Faced a tough dilemma? We’d love to hear about it. We’ve collected stories from all over the world and helped people navigate challenging situations.

Use our anonymous form to send us your story.

Latest News

Quitting Decisions

Employees leave their jobs for many reasons. In 2019, NBC News correspondent David Novak reported that 79% of employees quit their jobs because of a lack of appreciation. Note that 60% of Americans claim to be more motivated by recognition than money. 

Some resignations are about taking a significant, better career opportunity. Other reasons include unfavorable working conditions, inflexible schedules, the need to relocate with a spouse, and lack of challenge. But some employees quit their job over principles.

I believe that all of us will face at least two “quitting decisions” in our life. First, when an employer or a supervisor takes a clearly wrong position, unethical or contrary to our personal values, the situation must be corrected, or we can no longer work there.

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